Archive for Student Projects

Comfrey & English Plantain Salves

Comfrey (Symphytum Officianale) &

English Plantain (Plantago Lanceolata) Salve

by Tanja Hurt

Comfrey is a plant of the borage family that grows in moist areas, most commonly found along creeks and rivers. The dark brown roots of the plant push out fast-growing sprouts in the late spring. The bristly stalk and leaves bring forth bell-shaped violet or white-yellow blossoms that hang downward in a weeping manner. The leaves are so well bound to the stalk that they are nearly impossible to rip off the plant with bare hands. Medicinal herbalists have traditionally associated comfrey’s ability to heal its own wounds with the plant’s ability to heal human wounds. » Read more

Sage (Salvia Officinalis) Tincture

Sage (Salvia Officinalis) Tincture

by Tanja Hurt

Sage is a labiate that was already recognized in antiquity as having healing properties. In the Middle Ages, monks brought sage with them across the Alps as they founded monasteries in the Teutonic lands. Charlemagne even knew of the healing properties of sage and recommended it to be cultivated in monastery gardens across the Holy Roman Empire. The the name sage comes from the Old French (13th Century) sauge, which stems from the herb’s Latin name salvia. The Latin name salvia derives from the Latin adjective salvus, which means “healthy.” » Read more

Reishi Mushroom Tincture – Double Extraction

Reishi Mushroom Tincture – Double Extraction

by Pamala Wilson

I wanted to try the double extraction based on the information I’ve read about making tinctures from mushrooms.  According to Mountain Rose Herbs, mushrooms like reishi contain some constituents that are water-soluble, called beta-glucans, and some that are alcohol-soluble, called triterpenes.  A double extraction effectively pulls out both of these constituents without harming the shelf life of the tincture. » Read more

‘Tis the Elderberry Syrup Season!

While the Cold & Flu yells: “It’s our Season.”

Elderberry simply, but firmly, says: “NOPE!”

by Shannyn Caldwell

If you make your way through the Holistic Health Professional, Traditional Doctor of Naturopathy, Clinical Herbalist  or  Master Herbalist programs at Genesis, you will learn to make tinctures and syrups, teas, tonics, decoctions, poultices, and salves. » Read more

Bug Away Spray

Bug Away Spray

by Regina Rigney MH, TND

Ingredients

  • 4 Tbsp. Witch Hazel
  • 2 Tbsp. Vodka (80-100 proof) – preservative
  • 3 Tbsp. Carrier Oil with bug repelling properties (grape seed, jojoba, almond, olive, neem, or a combination of two or more oils).
  • 100 drops of essential oils (blend)

Any of the following essential oils can be used when making bug repellent. You may use just one or a combination of oils. Each oil has different bug repelling properties so it is much more effective to use a combination.

Basil Cypress Lemongrass
Bergamot Eucalyptus Peppermint
Cedarwood Geranium (Rose) Rosemary
Citronella Lavender Spearmint
Clove Lemon Tea Tree
Thyme

Directions & Use

Pour the the witch hazel, vodka, and carrier oil(s) into a 4 oz. dark colored spray bottle and shake well. Add the essential oils and shake again. Label the bottle! It is important that a dark colored bottle is used to protect the essential oils from sunlight. Store the bottle in a cool area (not in the car). Extreme heat will alter the oils making them less effective.

Calendula and Yarrow

Snip20160811_2Calendula and Yarrow: Herbal Preparation Projects
by Barbara Richey

Calendula (Calendula officinalis)

I made a caendula ointment. Calendula is a beautiful golden flower that can be found in eastern Canada, south through New England, west through Pennsylvania and Ohio, north through Michigan and Wisconsin.  In the west, it is cultivated in California.  Calendula features warm gold blossoms. Once they bloom the flowers can be picked throughout the season.

Calendula is an herb that is used to heal the skin. It’s great for scrapes, bruises, insect bites and minor wounds. It can also be used for sore and/or infected gums.  I enjoyed working with this flower because of all of the useful healing properties. I have family members with eczema and varicose veins. I created salves to treat their skin ailments.  PDF – Calendula and Yarrow

Stimulating Senses with Cinnamon

Carla BergStimulating Senses with Cinnamon  
by Carla Berg

There are a variety of ways to use cinnamon spice holistically. Below are just a few examples, along with how they can stimulate our five basic human senses. Within each category, the tincture process is explained, and then a medicinal use is listed as it correlates with our senses.

Sight: The cinnamon bark, derived from being peeled off an evergreen tree, curled into flavorful, long tubes looked delicious with their nice brownish red color. I knew this would be a popular tincture choice to have around this fall!

PDF – Stimulating Senses with Cinnamon

A Beekeeper in Mexico…

Snip20160811_1A Beekeeper in Mexico Named Gaudencio and  the Wonders of His Honey 

by Angela Blycker  www.peacefulwomenshealth.com

My husband and I recently took time for an unusual date:  We visited local beekeeper, Señor Gaudencio, in a small town called Nealtican, about a 20 minute drive from our home here in San Pedro Cholula in Puebla, Mexico.

We wanted to learn some of the methods and secrets of Gaudencio’s trade, get personal insight into the benefits of all the properties of honey and of course, purchase some of the pure golden sweetness for ourselves.

Gaudencio greeted us just outside his property, located on the edge of town. His 55-year old eyes twinkled as he shook our hands, obviously pleased that some gringos were sincerely interested in his life’s passion. Delicate purple flowers of spanish jasmine, periwinkle hydrangeas, traditional magenta bougainvillea and a host of other randomly planted flowers and cacti lined his dirt driveway. His simply constructed concrete white house was on the left, his work yard and buildings to the right. We walked to the right, past the small pond filled with floating plants and koi fish and under the makeshift clothesline where fresh laundry hung. The sound of bees filled the air like soft and busy music. I instinctively darted to avoid them, but Gaudencio walked to his shop nonchalantly as if they were his friends and belonged all around him. PDF – A Beekeeper in Mexico…

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