Archive for Apitherapy

Products from the Hive – Part III: BEEBREAD

Beebread!  Who knew?  With a name like that it’s not hard to imagine all those little honey bees scurrying around the kitchen wearing their teeny-tiny aprons and their teeny-tiny Toqués.  Yes.  While that is easy to imagine, it is slightly more difficult to shake that image from one’s mind and come back to reality.

Of all the products of the hive, beebread is the least explored and possibly one of the most valuable nutritionally.  Also referred to as “Ambrosia,” which means the food of the gods, or “Perga” translated “tower.”  The terminology denotes the strengthening effect of beebread as it is utilized by the body. » Read more

Products from the Hive – Part II: POLLEN

Pollen is the male seed of the plant located in the flower which is required for fertilization and subsequent seed development.  It consists of a minute particle of 50/1.000-millimeter corpuscles which form at the free end of the stamen. Every flower has pollen and this pollen provides about 40% of the nutritional needs of young bees.

Honey bees practice ‘flower fidelity’ as they only visit one type of flower with each trip from the hive.  This is awesome for pollination!  She (all honey bee workers are sterile females) lands on a flower and begins to moisten the dry pollen with her mouth using nectar carried from the hive in one of her two stomachs.  Each pollen granule has between four and ten million grains of pollen.  Next, the moistened pollen is packed into the “pollen baskets”, the corbiculae (stiff hairs), of her hind legs.  Typically, dry pollen particles stick to the worker bee’s body and catch a ride to the next flower.  In this manner pollination occurs as the bee lands on flower after flower. » Read more

Products from the Hive – Part I: HONEY

Author: Darlene Jorgens

Honey bees belong to the genus Apis mellifera Linnaeus.  They are distinguished by their ability to produce and store great quantities of honey and also make their nests from wax.  Their products are exclusively derived from the nectar, pollen, or resin from plants.  In fact, plants need bees as much as bees need plants, and mankind desperately needs both the bees and the plants for our survival.  Apis mellifera and its symbiotic relationship with both plants and people is an integral part of herbalism. » Read more

A Beekeeper in Mexico…

Snip20160811_1A Beekeeper in Mexico Named Gaudencio and  the Wonders of His Honey 

by Angela Blycker  www.peacefulwomenshealth.com

My husband and I recently took time for an unusual date:  We visited local beekeeper, Señor Gaudencio, in a small town called Nealtican, about a 20 minute drive from our home here in San Pedro Cholula in Puebla, Mexico.

We wanted to learn some of the methods and secrets of Gaudencio’s trade, get personal insight into the benefits of all the properties of honey and of course, purchase some of the pure golden sweetness for ourselves.

Gaudencio greeted us just outside his property, located on the edge of town. His 55-year old eyes twinkled as he shook our hands, obviously pleased that some gringos were sincerely interested in his life’s passion. Delicate purple flowers of spanish jasmine, periwinkle hydrangeas, traditional magenta bougainvillea and a host of other randomly planted flowers and cacti lined his dirt driveway. His simply constructed concrete white house was on the left, his work yard and buildings to the right. We walked to the right, past the small pond filled with floating plants and koi fish and under the makeshift clothesline where fresh laundry hung. The sound of bees filled the air like soft and busy music. I instinctively darted to avoid them, but Gaudencio walked to his shop nonchalantly as if they were his friends and belonged all around him. PDF – A Beekeeper in Mexico…